29 Aug 2016

Part of Music and Müller, a series foregrounding the contributions of Dutch cinematographer Robby Müller to movies loved for their soundtracks. Other screenings in the series include Ghost Dog: The Way of the Samurai, Repo Man, and They All Laughed.

August 29th, Bar Le Ritz PDB’s microretrospective, Music and Müller, closes with 24 Hour Party People (2002) by Michael Winterbottom.

Steve Coogan plays Tony Wilson, real-life television personality and head of Factory Records, the label that brought us Joy Division, New Order, A Certain Ratio, Happy Mondays, and The Durutti Column among others. Unequal parts fact, fiction, and hearsay, the film is a stylish retelling of the ups and downs of Factory across 20 years, as Wilson guides us from the punk era through post-punk and into modern rave culture. Postmodern as shit, 24 Hour Party People features cameos by the likes of Howard Devoto and Mark E. Smith, a run’n’gun gonzo digital aesthetic, and a stacked soundtrack by the Factory roster.

Oh! For the gearheads out there, Müller shot the film with a Sony DSR-PD150, the same camera David Lynch would later get a hold of for Inland Empire (2006).

GA / 18 +

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21h00

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02 Sep 2016

don’t stop thinking about fleetwood mac.
you feel that their music follows you everywhere.
it could be monday morning, in the bermuda triangle, and you still can’t get them out of your dreams.

just tell yourselves some little lies and come see one of the seven wonders, bar le ritz pdb.

FILM SCREENING – 20h30
ALL FLEETWOOD MAC DANCE PARTY – 22h30 -3h00

$5 – $10 PWYC nobody turned away

GA / 18 +

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20h00

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12 Sep 2016

Monday, September 12th, Bar Le Ritz PDB presents Donald Cammell and Nicolas Roeg’s Performance (1970). Shot and co-directed by Roeg (The Man Who Fell to Earth, Don’t Look Now), Performance marks the directorial debut of Cammell (White of the Eye, Demon Seed) and acting debut of The Rolling Stones’ Mick Jagger.

Chas (James Fox) is a foot soldier for an East London gang. After internal issues with the organization lead to the vandalism of his apartment and his killing a local gangster, Chas packs his bags and goes into hiding. Though at first planning on making for the British countryside, Chas ends up seeking refuge in the home of a reclusive rock star (Jagger) and his romantic partners. During their brief cohabitation, the two men challenge, antagonize, charm, and begin to influence each other in unexpected ways, culminating in a deliriously logic-bending finale.

Though completed in 1968, it was only released in 1970. Cammell, a gifted painter and prominent figure in London’s underground scene prior to his film work, would direct three more features in the following 30 years before his deat. That the film was initially poorly received and took some time to amass the enormous following it has today is probably no surprise to anyone who has seen it.

It’s been claimed that Warner initially wanted to destroy the negative after viewing an early cut of Performance because they were so appalled. The film, a masterpiece, has since been faithfully restored and released on bluray for your viewing pleasure.

GA / 18 +

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20h00

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